The Arduino ProtoShield v5

ProtoShield v5 Clone
The breadboard fits perfectly on the ProtoShield.

Arduino ‘shields’ – add-on boards that connect to the Arduino’s headers to add additional capabilities – are handy things, but sometimes you need something a little more custom. Although it’s possible to make your own, the Arduino’s famously non-standard pin spacing makes it difficult, but there’s a solution: the ProtoShield.

As its name suggests, the ProtoShield is a shield which makes prototyping on an Arduino significantly easier. Often supplied in kit form, the ProtoShield’s design is open source. As a result, it’s possible to get the device pre-made from a variety of sources, which sadly means you’re often taking a gamble on quality unless you buy directly from a reputable supplier.

The shield on test, unfortunately, is from no such source: manufactured by an unknown Chinese OEM and sold through Hong Kong gadget site DealExtreme, the design is based directly on Adafruit’s implementation of the ProtoShield with the logo removed before the PCB has been printed. That’s in direct contravention of the Creative Commons licence under which the open source design is provided, and we’d recommend you look elsewhere if you’re planning on buying one.

The shield itself arrives as two separate components: the ProtoShield, plus a mini-breadboard with an adhesive pad on the underside. This breadboard is specifically designed to fit on top of the ProtoShield, allowing you – if you so choose – to combine the two into a portable prototyping platform.

The other option is to use the mini-breadboard on another project, and concentrate on the ProtoShield itself. The PCB is covered in through-hole soldering points, and a glance at the underside reveals a combination of connected and disconnected circuit paths. There’s room for a wireless module, an SOIC solder pad, and in addition to the usual Arduino headers there’s an additional five for ground and 5V on many designs.

The concept is simple: prototype the layout of your custom shield’s components with the breadboard, and when you’re ready solder the components in place directly onto the shield to create a permanent custom creation. It’s a neat idea, but there’s a problem: the ProtoShield isn’t cheap. Even as an unlicensed knock-off shipped from China, the ProtoShield will set you back around £7, which compares poorly with some stripboard and a set of angled headers.

As a prototyping platform using the stick-on breadboard, however, the ProtoShield is great. If your project calls for LEDs, you’ll be pleased to see two already form part of the shield’s design, along with a handy switch. The fact that the reset switch is brought to the top is also a welcome sight, as many shields forget how inaccessible the Arduino’s version can be when the shield is in place.

Pro: It’s a great portable prototyping platform when combined with the breadboard.
Con: While easy, it’s an expensive way to make your own shields.
Supplier: DealExtreme (uncredited clone of Lady Ada’s ProtoShield)
Score: 7/9

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